Blogging at beginning of year

Class photo
Creative Commons License Photo Credit: Anna M via Compfight

So you have spent many hours of your holidays or evenings getting your blog ready, even maybe taking part in the refresher course. You are overloaded with information and new terminology.

But how are you going to start blogging with your students?

Here are a few suggestions:

  • Start with paper bloggingHere is a post explaining how to do this. A video of grade 3 students doing paper blogging.
  • Why not create a bulletin board in the classroom explaining the terminology (check glossary in this blog header area) and adding the paper blogs in the post area.
  • Talk to students about creating safe, secure passwords. This blog post includes some videos for students to watch on passwords.
  • Check out how this teacher begins blogging with her class – great list of student friendly blogs to discuss.

In class meetings, discuss:

  • blog title and tagline
  • blogging guidelines – create page on your blog so parents also understand – link to post about pages and guidelines
  • quality comments – show Mrs Yollis’ video by her students and check out how she teaches quality commenting – video at bottom of this post
  • ideas for posts
  • monitors for blogging – eg class photographer, class reporters

So far, all this has been done before students even write on your class blog.

Have students leave comments on your posts without having logged in. This will help when they leave comments on other blogging platforms such as blogger, wordpress and kidblogs. Talk about their email address, the anti-spam word, how to change the anti-spam or captcha if they can’t read it.

Now teach them how to login, update their profile and change their password.

Have lots of posts for students to leave quality comments on. Allow them to visit other blogs on your sidebar to leave comments on those blog posts.

Finally allow those students who are commenting well to start writing posts on the blog – maybe working in pairs to start with.

Any thing else students could do early in their blogging?

 

Challenges with blogging

This is the next post in the #EdublogsClub series.

The thing I find most challenging about blogging with teachers and students is keeping the momentum going. Often students will start a blog as required by a teacher for perhaps a language arts or history unit. If time is not given during class, often these blogs go by the wayside very quickly. I find those students who blog about their passions are more likely to continue blogging even when the teacher is not there.

When I run the student blogging challenge (BTW next one starts first Sunday in March), again students, especially the older ones, often don’t write the posts or leave comments on other student blogs. It is only the very keen ones who do this regularly. Some students will do it though, if it is needed for assessment and bonus marks.

Teachers also need the momentum to keep blogging. I find if they use it as a normal part of the curriculum or as a way to connect with parents, the class blog is more likely to be updated. But if they see it as an add on to the already overcrowded curriculum, then the blog will sit there with very little added to it.

If teachers also have their students as contributors to the blog, then they can write posts about what is happening in class or things they are passionate about. This will also keep the blog going as parents and relatives are likely to leave comments on posts written by their own child.

Readers: If you have a class blog or website, how do you keep the momentum going? Who is the blog for? Who can post on the blog?

 

Free Web Tools

This is the next post in #EdublogsClub. It came at a very appropriate time, as this morning I was running a refresher course on blogging for teachers who have either been blogging for a while or just starting out.

I showed them three different web tools they can embed on their blog.   You can read how I ran the Refresher Day course here!

Padlet

The first tool I showed was Padlet which is like sticky notes but online.

The Padlet below was embedded into the Refresher Day post so the teachers could add a sticky note to share what they wanted to learn while allowing them to see how easy it could be used with students.

Made with Padlet

 

Add  your own note to the Padlet below to share your favorite tools you use with students.

Made with Padlet

 

Symbaloo

The next tool I shared was Symbaloo which you can use to gather resources or websites you often use in class.

In the top right corner of this blog there is a drop down menu under Tools to Use.

This links to the following three Symbaloo:

  1. Coding Sites – from an Irish friend of mine who I met through blogging.
  2. Digital storytelling – a symbaloo webmix which I created from lots of resources from other teachers.
  3. Image and sounds symbaloo –  I use with the blogging challenge as it has links for using images and sounds on your blog.

I’ve embedded my avatar creator symbaloo below:

Voki

The third web tool I showed them was Voki where you can create a talking avatar.  Great for text to speech book reviews and children soon realise punctuation is important.

If I make a free version without signing in I can only add a link to the Voki, but if I join and sign in, I can use the embed code.

I’ve embedded a Voki below:

Terms of Service and Education Versions

If you have visited these three websites I have linked in this post, you will also have noticed they also have Terms of Service and Privacy Policy links at the bottom of their home page.

If you are working with students under 13, it is always a good idea to check these as you might need to get permission from parents for students to use these sites. (Good way for parents to see how kids can be creative on the web.)

Also you will notice that both Padlet and Voki have school versions. If your school prefers to keep control of what students create and don’t like them having their work out in public, then you might be able to opt in for the education version.

Always check for a special education version whenever you look at new tools.