NotatISTE2017

This time last year, I was attending the ISTE conference in Denver, Colorado. But, unfortunately this year I am #NotatISTE.

Even though I am not there in person, I can attend parts of the conference virtually. Here are some of the ways to do that:

1. Twitter – you don’t need to be a member of Twitter to take part in the conversations there. A great place to get ideas for use in the classroom, tools to use on your blog and other educators to chat with around the world.  You do need to be a Twitter member, though, if you want to include your opinion on any of the topics.

Follow hashtags on Twitter – #ISTE2017, #ISTE17, #NotatISTE2017, #NotatISTE17

2. #NotatISTE Google+ Community – this began a few years ago and now has thousands of teachers and educators around the world participating in this community. You have a chance to create your own avatar and include it on your own badge with ribbons. There is a Daily Challenge as well as a general challenge for the conference period.

3. ISTE unplugged live – sessions run by educators not attending ISTE and using the Blackboard Collaborate rooms for the presentations.

4. Periscope – follow educators as they video what is happening at ISTE. Check out #passthescopeedu and their weebly found here, Shelly Sanchez has part of the keynote here.

5. Follow Sue Waters who has created a great blog post about NotatISTE and how she makes the most of attending the conference virtually.

6. Flipboard – a way to curate lots of blog posts relating to ISTE

7. Livebinders – another way to curate resources from ISTE

Authentic audience

Political Officer of the U.S. Embassy provided a presentation for the 2016 U.S. Election Discussion Series at the Information Resource Center (IRC). He answers the students' questions including those on political party conventions, primaries and caucuses.

Creative Commons License U.S. Embassy Phnom Penh via Compfight

From my previous post, you will see reason 7 to blog is:

To give students a global and authentic audience

That is why I began blogging back in 2008 – I wanted my students to see there is a world beyond their small town. We began with a class blog, then each student had their own blog, all open to the world.

But the world was not coming to them; the only comments they got were from each other or from me their teacher and occasionally a parent.

How could I get a global, authentic audience to visit my students’ blogs?

Back in 2008, I didn’t have any contacts to other teachers around the world. The students didn’t have any relatives living in other countries.

Then I remembered Sue Waters, my mentor who had started me on my blogging journey.  I contacted her and she sent out a tweet to her educator friends on Twitter. I had joined Twitter 6 months previously but had not used it because I couldn’t really see any value to it.

Soon I had 3 teachers wanting to link our classes and to leave comments on student blogs. Here was the authentic audience, here was a global audience.

  • Mrs Smith – grade 6/7 in Canada
  • Inez – grade 6 students in Portugal
  • Mr Bogush – grade 7 in USA

But this would never have happened if I didn’t have that one person who had a connected personal learning network.

So how are you the teacher going to develop a network of other educators who can then help comment on your student blogs?

I will be writing another post on developing a PLN (personal learning network).