Computer Science

Hobart College

By

Midyear exam topics

Here’s a list of topics that you can expect to see on the midyear exams…

Cr 1 Algorithms

  • Pseudocode
  • Initially/when
  • User Interface design

Cr 2 Java

  • Order of operations
  • Data types (e.g. int v double)
    • Conversion and casting (e.g. int <> char)
  • Program traces
    • if / switch
    • for / while
  • Arrays
  • Methods

Cr 4 Computer Architecture

  • Boolean
    • Expressions
    • Logic circuits
    • Truth tables
    • Karnaugh maps
  • TOY Machine
  • The Von Neumann Architecture

Cr 5 Data Representation

  • Binary
    • Addition
    • Conversion
      • binary <> decimal
      • binary <> hex
    • 2’s complement
    • Fractions
    • Floating point
  • ASCII / Unicode
  • Array representation
  • File sizes

By

Week 11

This week we get started with Boolean logic. We’ll take a look at propositions, Boolean operators (mainly NOT, AND, OR), truth tables, logic circuits, and the use of logic laws to simplify expressions.

We’ll also start to see hos this relates to programming with a prac that’s focused on the use of if statements and switch statements.

By

Week 5

I’m going to be away next week (Week 6), so this week we’re going to finish off our study of data representation. The aim is to get you to a point where you’ll be ready to do the next couple of worksheets. There should be plenty to keep you busy while I’m away.

  • Binary
    • File sizes
    • Floating point numbers
  • Pracs
    • Complete Prac 2
    • Start Prac 3

By

Week 4

Most important thing first… Given that we’ve only just managed to get Eclipse working on some students’ laptops, I’ve decided to adjust the deadlines for the first two pracs…

  • Prac 1 now due *this Friday*
  • Prac 2 now due *next Friday*

And here’s what we’ll be doing this week (more or less – probably less, but we’ll give it a shot anyway)…

  • Binary – there are some notes and a worksheet for each of these…
    • Addition
    • File sizes
  • Algorithms
    • Review Algorithms worksheet 2
    • Algorithm exercise – spot the mistakes
    • DIY algorithm – we’ll do a class brainstorm of possible algorithm topics, then you’ll work in groups of 2 or 3 to create an example algorithm
  • Pracs
    • Review Prac 1
    • Work on Prac 2 – colours and fonts

By

Week 2

Here’s a quick recap of what we did this week.

  • Algorithms – We looked at the Initially/When model that is useful for designing Java applets and other event-driven user interfaces.
  • Binary – We started our study of data representation with an introduction to binary numbers. We looked at how to represent positive whole numbers and fractions in binary.
  • Java – We started programming in Java with our first prac.

By

Welcome to Computer Science 2017

Hi, my name is Rob and I’ll be your teacher for Computer Science.

This week we’ll begin an exploration of algorithms and, if we’ve got time get started with some very basic programming using Eclipse.

Course Handbook

Installing Eclipse

You’ll be able to do most of the programming you need to do on school computers, but you’ll get much more out of this course if you’ve got access to Eclipse on a computer at home as well.

To run Eclipse you will need to download this package.

  • Eclipse IDE for Java Developers
    • Note: Eclipse doesn’t have an installer, it just needs to be extracted (and moved to program files or somewhere suitable?). For convenience, you might like to create a link to it from the desktop.

You may also need to (re)install or update Java if you have any problems running Java code.

“Hello World”

Here’s a simple “Hello World” program…

import java.awt.*;
import java.applet.*;
public class Hello_World extends Applet
{
    public void paint(Graphics g)
    {
        g.drawString("Hello World", 20,20);
    }
}

By

Exam topics

Here’s a rough list of topics that have appeared on previous exams…

Cr 1 Algorithms

  • Pseudocode
  • Initially/when
  • User Interface design

Cr 2 Java

  • Order of operations
  • Data types (e.g. int v double)
    • Conversion and casting (e.g. int <> char)
  • Program traces
    • if / switch
    • for / while
  • Arrays
  • Methods

Cr 3 Objects

  • Declare, instantiate, initialise
  • Methods

Cr 4 Computer Architecture

  • Boolean
    • Expressions
    • Logic circuits
    • Truth tables
    • Karnaugh maps
  • TOY
  • General computer architecture e.g.
    • von Neumann architecture
    • the machine cycle (fetch, decode, execute)
    • the role of the Java Virtual Machine

Cr 5 Data Representation

  • Binary
    • Addition
    • Conversion
      • binary <> decimal
      • binary <> hex
    • 2’s complement
    • Fractions
    • Floating point
  • ASCII / Unicode
  • Array representation
  • File sizes

By

Welcome to Computer Science 2015!

Welcome

Creative Commons License Joe Shlabotnik via Compfight

My name is Rob, and I’ll be your teacher for Computer Science this year.

Computer Science is on Line 4. Lessons are on Mondays 1:40-3:10, Wednesdays 10:45-12:00 and Fridays 8:45-10:30. Tutorials will be arranged during the year as required.

Outside of class time, you’ll normally find me in my staffroom (A018) or A015, but I’m only at Claremont College on Mon, Wed, Fri.

More information, including my contact details and the course outline, will be given out in class.

By

Welcome to Computer Science 2014!

My name is Rob, and I’ll be your teacher for Computer Science this year.

Timetable

Computer Science is on Line 1 on the timetable. Lessons are on Mondays 9:00-10:40, Wednesdays 11:10-12:40 and Fridays 11:10-12:40. Times for additional support will be set up during the year as required.

Contact

If you ever need to contact me, there are multiple options:

  • Call/text: will be given in class
  • Email: rob.torok@education.tas.gov.au
  • Face-to-face: Outside of class time, you’ll either find in my staffroom (A018) or the Robotics lab (I004), but I’m only at Claremont College on Mon, Wed, Fri.

Course details

Firstly, the most important thing for you to note (and bookmark) is that this blog is your first point of reference for everything. Any lesson plans, notices, announcement, homework tasks, links etc. can all be found on the blog. The blog is: http://robscompsci.wordpress.com/

The course document is available on the TQA website, and I recommend you read it. http://www.tqa.tas.gov.au/4DCGI/_WWW_doc/166827/RND01/ITC315113.pdf

Course content

The course is a 150 hour course, made up of four interrelated components:

  • Programming and Problem Solving (approx 70 hours)
  • Computer Fundamentals & Computer Limitations (approx 40 hours)
  • Social/Ethical Issues and Professional Responsibility (approx 10 hours)
  • Major Project (approx 30 hours)

Assessment

There are nine assessment criteria for Computer Science. All criteria are assessed through a range of assessment tasks, the first 5 criteria will be also be examined internally with a mid-year exam and externally with a final exam.

Assessment tasks may include class activities, worksheets, practical tasks, tests and examinations.

Tasks that are completed in class with assistance, or done collaboratively have a weight of 1, tasks completed individually or without assistance generally have a weight of 2, tests and examinations have a weight of 3.

I will keep track of your attendance and results. You do not have access to these details, but you may ask to see your own record at any point in time. For any subject, it’s a good idea to regularly check your results and discuss them with your teacher.

Course criteria

Your assessment in Computer Science is based on the degree to which you can:

  1. *Design and evaluate algorithmic solutions to a range of problems
  2. *Demonstrate knowledge of a high level programming language
  3. *Use appropriate objects in the design of programs
  4. *Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of computer architecture
  5. *Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of data representation and storage
  6. Understand and apply the software development life cycle to a variety of problems
  7. Demonstrate understanding of the societal and professional responsibilities in the area of technology
  8. Plan, organise and complete activities
  9. Communicate technological information.

Expectations

Computer Science is a pre-tertiary subject and it does have a great deal of work associated with it. To have the best opportunity to do well in this class and be a valuable member of the class, you are expected to:

  • Attend every lesson (provide a note when you are unable to attend – when you do miss a lesson, it is your responsibility to check the blog and catch up on any missed work)
  • BE ON TIME
  • Bring paper and pens to every lesson
  • Check the blog every lesson so that you are prepared for class
  • Complete all set homework tasks on time
  • Ask questions when you do not understand the concept and/or need assistance
  • Be polite in class – to the teacher and fellow students

Laptops

Claremont College has loan laptops available for students enrolled in pre-tertiary subjects, or you can use your own laptop if you have one.

The software that you require for the class includes Eclipse, Word, PowerPoint and an Internet Browser.

You may only install legal software on the laptop. Any software you install must not affect the functioning of the computer (ie. slow it down or change network setting etc.). Any other software you install may not be used in class time.

You must regularly backup your work, the school is not responsible for your data.

In the event your computer requires repairs, ensure that your backups are up to date as repairs may involve re-formatting the computer.

Skip to toolbar